Japanese Language Courses

JAPANESE 111-1,2,3: Japanese I

Japanese I (JAPANESE 111-1, 2 and 3) is a yearlong course that covers the first half of college level elementary Japanese. In Japanese I, students will develop the four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing and learn many aspects of Japanese culture and society through various in-class activities, written assignments, and video viewing. Students will also learn to identify and self-correct errors in their language use to become independent learners. The instructor will assist in this learning process with oral and written feedback. Careful and thorough review and preparation for each class session are required.

Registration Requirements
Except for JAPANESE 111-1, students must pass the preceding course with C- or above, or must be placed into the course by the departmental placement test.

Learning Objectives 

The goal of Japanese I is to bring students’ overall Japanese proficiency to the Intermediate Low level defined by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Upon the satisfactory completion of the course, the students will be able to greet, introduce themselves, describe their families and friends, discuss their daily routines and experiences, and write letters to teachers and friends. 



Teaching Method 

This course is conducted mostly in Japanese, and class hours are spent mainly on oral proficiency development. Written assignments are given for reading and writing proficiency development. 



Evaluation Method
Class participation and performance; assignments; quizzes; oral and written examinations



Class Materials (Required)
Hasegawa, Y. (2005). Elementary Japanese (Volume One) with CD-ROM. Tuttle Publishing. ISBN: 978-0-8048-3504-6; AJALT (2012). JAPANESE FOR BUSY PEOPLE: Kana Workbook (for the Revised 3rd Edition). ISBN: 978-1-56836-401-8; Course Packet



Class Materials (Suggested)

Endo-Hudson, M (1994). English Grammar for Students of Japanese. Ann Arbor: The Olivia and Hill Press. ISBN: 0-934034-16-8; Makino, S. & Tsutsui M. (1989). Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar. Tokyo: The Japan Times. ISBN 4-7890-0454-6; Kodansha (2002). Kodansha's Essential Kanji Dictionary. Tokyo: Kodansha. ISBN: 978-4-7700-2891-4 / 4-7700-2891-1.

JAPANESE 121-1,2,3: Japanese II

Japanese II (JAPANESE 121-1, 2 and 3), a yearlong course, sequel to Japanese I (JAPANESE 111), covers the second half of basic Japanese grammar and prepares students for intermediate Japanese (JAPANESE 211). In this course, students continue developing the four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) through readings, video viewing, written assignments, and in-class activities. The emphasis will be on developing the skills necessary to use auxiliary verbs and complex sentences to express subtle differences in meaning and developing accuracy appropriate to the given contexts as well as building a solid foundation of Japanese with accurate use of vocabulary and sentence structures. Student will also practice describing their experiences and situations as well as summarizing a story that they heard/read/watched in an organized speech/writing. To be independent learners, students will learn to identify and self-correct errors in their language use. The instructor will assist in this process with oral and written feedback.

Registration Requirements
Students must pass the preceding course with C- or above, or must be placed into the course by the departmental placement test.

Learning Objectives
Upon the satisfactory completion of the course, students will be able to handle various types of more complex daily conversational situations and passages. The year-end proficiency goal of Japanese II is for the students to reach the Intermediate-Mid level defined by the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines (http://actflproficiencyguidelines2012.org/).

Teaching Method
Class hours are spent mainly on oral proficiency development, and written assignments are given for reading and writing skills development. Students are expected to be fully prepared for each lesson and to review what they did in each class. They are expected to read the textbook thoroughly, and do listening practices with CD on a regular basis. Useful expressions in daily life and social and cultural aspects in modern Japan are introduced through a series of videos. This course is conducted mostly in Japanese.

Evaluation Method
Class participation and performance; assignments; quizzes; oral and written examinations; essays

Class Materials (Required)
Hasegawa, Y. (2006) Elementary Japanese, vol. 2. Vermont: Tuttle Language Library. ISBN-13: 978-0804835060; ISBN-10: 0804835063;
Course Packet ($8-$10).

Class Materials (Suggested)
Kodansha's Essential Kanji Dictionary. Tokyo: Kodansha. ISBN: 978-4-7700-2891-4; Endo-Hudson, M. (1994). English Grammar for Students of Japanese. Ann Arbor: The Olivia and Hill Press. ISBN: 978-0-934034-16-6; Yoshida, M. & Nakamura, Y. (2002). Kodansha's Furigana English-Japanese Dictionary. Tokyo: Kodansha. ISBN: 978-4-7700-2751-1; Yoshida, M. & Nakamura, Y. (2002). Kodansha's Furigana Japanese-English Dictionary. Tokyo: Kodansha. ISBN: 978-4-7700-2750-4; Yoshida, M. & Nakamura, Y. (1999). Kodansha' Furigana Japanese Dictionary. Tokyo: Kodansha. ISBN: 978-4-7700-2480-0; Makino, S. & Tsutsui, M. (1989). Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar. Tokyo: The Japan Times. ISBN 978-4-7890-0454-1

JAPANESE 211-1,2,3: Japanese III

Japanese III (JAPANESE 211-1, 2, 3) is a yearlong course, sequel to Japanese II (JAPANESE 121-1, 2, 3), that covers college-level intermediate Japanese. In Japanese III, students will continue developing the four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and learning various aspects of Japanese culture and society through class discussions, written assignments, and TV drama viewing. The casual speech and formal writing styles are introduced, and students will become familiarized with different language use for different settings. This course is conducted in Japanese.

Registration Requirements
Students must pass the preceding course with C- or above, or must be placed into the course by the departmental placement test.

Learning Objectives
The goal of Japanese III is to bring students’ overall Japanese proficiency to the Intermediate High of the American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines. Upon the satisfactory completion of the course, the students will be able to 1) describe and narrate daily events and personal experiences in an organized manner, 2) summarize the main points of what is read, seen, or heard, 3) use approximately 500 basic kanji characters in context, 4) comfortably and appropriately handle daily situations 5) use various speech and written styles, and 6) communicate with native speakers on familiar topics in informal settings. The students are also expected to 7) deepen their understanding of customs, culture and social phenomena of contemporary Japan, and 8) learn to study independently.

Teaching Method
In-class discussion. Careful and thorough review and preparation for each class session are expected.

Evaluation Method
Class participation and performance, assignments, quizzes, oral and written examinations, essays, and projects.

Class Materials (Required)
Oka, M. et al. (2009). Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese. Tokyo: Kurosio Publishes. ISBN: 978-4-87424-447-0. Kano, C. et al. (2015). Basic Kanji Book Vol. 2 (New Edition). Tokyo: Bonjinsha. ISBN: 978-4-89358-883-8.

Class Materials (Suggested)
Kodansha. (2002). Kodansha Essential Kanji Dictionary. Tokyo: Kodansha International. ISBN: 978-4-7770-2891-4. Makino, S. & Tsutsui, M. (1995). A Dictionary of Intermediate Japanese Grammar. Tokyo: The Japan Times. ISBN: 978-4-7890-0775-8. Tomomatsu, E. & Wakuri, M (2004). Shokyuu Nihongo Sou-matome. Tokyo: 3A Corporation. ISBN: 978-4-88319-328-8.

JAPANESE 310-0 Special Topics in Reading Japanese Literature in Japanese 

Topic: Responses to the Pacific War: Trauma, Memory, and Accountability

This is an advanced Japanese language course that considers how Japanese writers responded to the Pacific War and its aftermath. We will study works representing the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, experiences on the frontline, and attempts to account for both personal and collective involvement in the abuses of war.  We will pay particular attention to how the form of literature reflects experiences of trauma and serves to accept or defer responsibility.  Primary readings will be in Japanese and discussion will be in English. Particular attention will be given to developing students’ reading and translation skills. Prerequisites: grade of at least C- in 211-3 or equivalent, or by placement test

Learning Objectives:
• Develop the Japanese vocabulary and understanding of grammatical structures to analyze and discuss works of literature, film, criticism and other advanced material
• Develop strategies for translating works of Japanese into English
• Enhance understanding of diverse literary styles in Japanese in order to grasp aesthetic and communicative nuances
• Gain familiarity with the ways in which Japanese literature reflected and intervened in issues facing Japan, Asia, and the world in the aftermath of WWII

Teaching Method:
In-class discussion and lecture

Evaluation Method:
Attendance and Participation: 25%
Weekly Assignments: 20%
Midterm Exam: 25%
Final Project (undergrad)/ Final Paper (grad): 30%

Class Materials (Required):
Reader
Rubin, Jay. Making Sense of Japanese. (New York: Kodansha, 2012).
Tomomatsu Etsuko and Miyamoto Jun. Donna toki, dô tsukau nihongo hyôgen bunkei
500 (Tokyo: Aruku, 1996).

JAPANESE 311-1, 312-1, 313-1, 314-1: Japanese IV

Japanese IV is a series of four independent upper-intermediate level courses. One of the four courses is offered each quarter, and they need not be taken in order. Any two of these courses or equivalent study abroad are required for the minor in Japanese Language and Culture. The aim of these courses is to bring students’ oral and written proficiencies toward the Advanced-Low level (ACTFL proficiency guidelines). Each course (JAPANESE 311-1, 312-1, 313-1 and 314-1) is designed to provide students with opportunities to further develop their overall Japanese language proficiency, to deepen their understanding of Japanese culture and sociolinguistic elements and to be familiarized with various styles of the language use. Each course prepares students to be more autonomous learners.

JAPANESE 311-1: Reading Modern Japanese Literature in Japanese

Focus on learning pre-1946 orthography and reading of original texts of modern short stories. Translation skills are emphasized; Discussion in English. Fulfills WCAS Ares VI distribution requirement.

Prerequisite
JAPANESE 211-3 or permission from the program (Placement test will be given.)

JAPANESE 312-1: Contemporary Japanese Literary Works for Reading and Discussion

Focus on reading contemporary Japanese poems, essays, non-fiction, and novels through various reading methods; Discussion in Japanese. For more information, contact Junko Sato.

Prerequisite
JAPANESE 211-3 or permission from the program (Placement test will be given.)

JAPANESE 313-1: Japanese IV: Japanese Newspaper Reading and News Listening

JAPANESE 313-1 is a low-advanced fourth-year Japanese language course. All of the fourth-year Japanese courses have the common goals to bring students’ overall proficiency to Advanced-Low by the proficiency guidelines of American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). JAPANESE 313-1 focuses on development of skills to read newspaper articles, to listen to news and to participate in intellectual discussions and debate on social and cultural phenomena of contemporary Japan. This class introduces the structures, styles and expressions commonly used in Japanese newspaper articles and news. The class provides a number of opportunities for reading newspaper articles in different topics, listening to semi-authentic news, and increasing the knowledge of kanji characters and compounds and, idiomatic expressions frequently used in news articles. The students will develop oral skills through in-class discussions and short presentations. This course does NOT provide training for writing skills development (All students taking this course should come with at least the intermediate-level writing skills, equivalent to the end of JAPANESE 211-3, and should be able to write an opinion paper in the plain style). The students who need writing skills development should take JAPANESE 314-1.

Registration Requirements
Students must have completed JAPANESE 211-3 with C- or above, or must be placed into the class by the departmental placement test.

Teaching Method
Classes are conducted only in Japanese. Most class time will be used for discussions and debate.

Evaluation Method
Kanji/vocabulary quizzes, assignments; oral and written examinations; active and productive class participation and class performance.

Class Materials (Required)
- Shimbun no Dokkai (3A Corporation, 2008) ISBN 978-4-88319-475-9.
- New Intermediate Kanji Book, vol.1, 3rd edition (Bonjinsha) ISBN 978-4-89358-810-4.

Class Materials (Suggested)
-Tanki Shuuchuu Shokyuu Nihongo Bunpoo Soumatome Point 20 (3A Corporation, 2004) ISBN 978-4-88319-328-8.
-Chuukyuu Nihongo Bunpoo Yooten Seiri Point 20 (3A Corporation, 2007) ISBN 978-4-88319-457-5.
- News no Nihongo Chookai 50 (3A Corporation, 2010) ISBN 978-4-88319-539-8.
- Jookyuu kara Chookyuu e Nihongo Chookyuu-Washa e no Kakehashi (3A Corporation, 2007) ISBN 978-488319-449-0

JAPANESE 314-1: Japanese Essay Writing

This Japanese Essay Writing course focuses on refining students’ writing skills. Students will be introduced to three types of writing samples (narrative, descriptive, and persuasive) and will practice writing skills through various steps. For each writing project, students engage in native writing sample reading, different types of pre-writing brainstorming activities, multiple draft writing, self and peer editing, and writing clinics. Throughout the quarter, students create a writing portfolio and observe their own writing processes and writing skills development in order to develop effective writing strategies.
This is a bridge course to the courses in students’ academic disciplines in which students may choose paper topics from their fields of study, such as literature, science, and social science. Past narrative paper genres include humor, love stories, memoirs, and mysteries. Past descriptive paper topics include stem cell research, Food Pyramid, Electoral College, history of jazz, and religious beliefs (Christianity and Judaism). Past argumentative paper topics include freedom of speech, affirmative action, gender roles, and influence of video games on children.

Registration Requirements:
Students must pass 211-3 with C- or above, or must be placed into the class by the departmental placement test.

Learning Objectives:
The course aims to bring students’ writing proficiency to the advanced level of the ACTFL proficiency guidelines, using narrative, descriptive, and persuasive essays. According to the guidelines, advanced-level writers are characterized by the ability to: write routine informal and some formal correspondence, narratives, descriptions, and summaries of a factual nature, narrate and describe in major time frames, using paraphrase and elaboration to provide clarity, in connected discourse of paragraph length, and express meaning that is comprehensible to those unaccustomed to the writing of non-natives, primarily through generic vocabulary, with good control of the most frequently used structures.

Teaching Method:
This course is conducted only in Japanese. The students will be introduced to three types of writing samples (narrative, descriptive, and persuasive) and will practice their writing skills through various steps: 1) Reviewing how to differentiate three writing styles (polite, plain and expository forms),
2) Trying different types of pre-writing brainstorming activities to find the most effective strategies for themselves, 3) Identifying and improving their own writing processes through a writing portfolio, 4) Learning to identify errors in their language use, 5) Learning to self-correct errors. The instructor will help the students through these processes with oral and written feedback. The instruction of writing will be supplemented by the review of grammar, vocabulary, and expressions, as well as writing clinics.

Evaluation Method:
Multiple drafts and final papers, Writing Portfolio, class participation and performance

Class Materials (Required):
Japanese for International College/Graduate Students 2: Composition. Tokyo: Alc, Inc. ISBN:
978-4-7574-0500-4; Supplemental handouts.

Class Materials (Suggested):
Makino, S. & Tsutsui, M. (1995). A Dictionary of Intermediate Japanese Grammar. Tokyo: The Japan
Times. ISBN: 978-4-7890-0775-7.