Hindi-Urdu Language Courses

HIND_URD 111: Hindi-Urdu I

(Meets 5 days a week)

Overview of the class
This course is a year long, three quarter sequence, and is meant for students with no Hindi-Urdu background. At the beginning of the three quarter sequence, the students are not expected to be able to speak, understand, read or write any Hindi-Urdu. In the first quarter (Hindi-Urdu 111-1) the students are introduced to the Hindi (Devanagari) script and to aspects of Hindi-Urdu grammar. By the end of this quarter the students are be able to talk about their family, their routines, their likes and dislikes, and also describe actions in progress. In the second quarter (Hindi-Urdu 111-2), as the students continue to learn new grammatical constructions, they are also introduced to the Urdu (Nastaliq) script. By the end of the second quarter the students are able to talk about events in the past and the future. The theme of the third quarter (Hindi-Urdu 111-3) is food. Among others, we use recipes to understand new grammatical constructions! The quarter culminates in the production of a cooking video that incorporates all the different grammatical constructions and new lexicon that the students have mastered. 

Registration Requirements
None for Hindi-Urdu 111-1, Hindi-Urdu 111-1 with a C- or better for Hindi-Urdu 111-2, Hindi-Urdu 111-2 with a C- or better for Hindi-Urdu 111-3, and by placement test or with instructor consent.

Teaching Method
Textbook, word-games, in-class materials

Evaluation Method
Assessment is based on weekly quizzes, attendance, classroom participation and presentations, home assignments, 3 mid-terms and an oral interview. No final exam.

Class Materials (Required)

Beginning Hindi by J. Pien and F. Farooqui

Beginning Urdu by J. Pien and F. Farooqui

Introduction to Hindi Grammar by Usha R. Jain


Class Materials (Suggested)
Essential Urdu Dictionary by Timsal Masud

Teach Yourself Hindi Dictionary By R. Snell

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries/

WCAS HIND_URD 116-0: Accelerated Hindi-Urdu Literacy

(Meets 5 days a week)

This quarter long course is designed for heritage learners with speaking and listening skills in Hindi-Urdu but limited or no reading and writing skills in either Devanagari or Nastaliq or both the scripts. The students will learn how to read and write in Nastaliq and Devanagari, and will also be given a broad overview of the Hindi-Urdu grammar, with focus on areas that tend to be error prone for learners of Hindi-Urdu. At the end of the quarter the students will take a test, on the basis of which they could be placed into higher level Hindi-Urdu courses, and be eligible to take courses such as HIND_URD 121-2 or HINDI_URD 211-2, etc.

Registration Requirements
With instructor/departmental consent.

Teaching Method
Relevant excerpts from textbooks, handouts, excerpts from authentic printed and online texts

Evaluation Method
Assessment is based on 4/6 quizzes, attendance, classroom participation and presentations, home assignments, 3 mid-terms and a final paper. No final exam.

Class Materials (Required)
None


Class Materials (Suggested – these may change)

Beginning Hindi by J. Pien and F. Farooqui

Beginning Urdu by J. Pien and F. Farooqui

Introduction to Hindi Grammar by Usha R. Jain

Essential Urdu Dictionary by Timsal Masud

Teach Yourself Hindi Dictionary By R. Snell

http://dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries/

HINDI-URDU 121 Hindi-Urdu II

(Meets 5 days a week)

Overview of class
This is a year long, three quarter sequence. The students start the year by working on reinforcing all the language skills attained the year before and building speaking skills/comprehension, as well as expanding the grammar and vocabulary. We do so by reading poems, short stories, watching and discussing movie clips, short films and videos, and making in-class Microsoft Powerpoint presentations. Some of the topics that we touch upon during the year are short stories by Premchand, stories from the Panchatantra, the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the tales of Akbar and Birbal, etc.

Note: Please purchase all the required textbooks in the fall quarter, as this is the only quarter that they are ordered during the year.

Registration Requirements
C- or better in Hindi-Urdu 111-3 for Hindi-Urdu 121-1, Hindi-Urdu 121-1 for Hindi-Urdu 121-2, Hindi-Urdu 121-2 for Hindi-Urdu 121-3, and by placement test or with instructor consent.

Teaching Method
Textbook, extra materials, movies.

Evaluation Method
The students are graded on the basis of home assignments, weekly quizzes, 3 midterms, attendance and class participation.


Class Materials (Required)
Advanced Hindi Grammar (2007) by U. Jain. Publisher: Institute of East Asian Studies; ISBN-10: 094461342X ISBN-13: 978-0944613429

Intermediate Hindi (1996) by Y. Kachru and Pandharipande Publisher: Motilal Banarsidass. ISBN-10: 8120805585 ISBN-13: 978-8120805583

Intermediate Hindi Reader (1999) by U. Jain with K. Schomer. Publisher: Institute of East Asian Studies; ISBN-10: 087725351X ISBN-13: 978-0877253518 

HINDI-URDU 211 Hindi-Urdu III

(Meets 2 days a week)

Topics in Intermediate Hindi-Urdu – These topics are independent of each other, and can be taken in any sequence.

Registration Requirements
C- or better in Hindi-Urdu 121-3 or equivalent, or by placement test or with instructor consent.

1. Hind_Urd 211-1-20 – Society on Screen

Have you ever wondered if people of all backgrounds speak Hindi-Urdu the same way, or if the language varies from place to place, class to class, person to person? If so, what determines this variation? What is the effect of the speaker’s social and economic context on their language, and inversely, what and how does language tell us about somebody’s background? What other variations are there in Hindi-Urdu? What role does time play in all of this?

In this course we will look at a handful of Bollywood movies from various decades, with the stories set in different socio-economic circumstances. We will watch selected scenes and analyze the language used to se what it reveals about the movie characters.

You will be evaluated on your mastery of new pertinent vocabulary, on your ability to do verbal analyses and discussions in the Hindi-Urdu language, as well as your ability to write longer responses in Hindi-Urdu via home assignments and 2 Midterms. As a final assignment, you will be required to write a movie plot, and a dialog in Hindi-Urdu, i.e. you will have to demonstrate the ability to produce appropriate indirect and direct speech (about 5 pages).

2. Hind_Urd 211-2-20 -  Hindi-Urdu in the Media 

Like many other languages, the Hindi-Urdu language spoken daily at home or in the street varies rather dramatically from its more formal version used by the media (print or RTV). In this course we will take a look at a range of topics in different kinds of media, and learn how to understand the longer sentences and the vocabulary that draws heavily either on the Sanskrit, or the Persian/Arabic roots.  We will look at local, national (US, India and Pakistan) and international news. We may compare some related articles in Hindi-Urdu and English and see how some terms are translated into Hindi-Urdu. We will also follow up on some news.

We will spend about a week and half on each of the proposed topics:

a. Politics

b. Weather and Environment

c. Peace/War/Terrorism

d. Social issues

e. Sports

f. Entertainment

Evaluation:  Weekly vocabulary quizzes, weekly Hindi-Urdu newsletters (with a partner), translation based weekly home assignments, weekly in-class presentations, 2 midterms, and a production of news telecast or broadcast in Hindi-Urdu.

Bibliography: current articles and podcasts from Hindi and Urdu language sources such as the newspapers NavBharat Times and Dainik Jagaran, BBC Hindi.com, Sahafat Urdu Daily, BBC Urdu.com, telecasts and shows from web resources.

3. Hind_Urd 211-3-20 -  Conversational Hindi-Urdu

This course will focus mainly on sustaining conversations in Hindi on various topics ranging from gossip to politics. There will be some reading, but very little writing done. Each topic will be introduced either through a short written passage, or through a video or audio clip. After introducing the basic vocabulary, phrases and expressions necessary for talking about that topic, the students will be given a situation in which they find themselves, and create an impromptu conversation that fits the situation (and the topic).

Topics covered in class:

a. Extended small talk (talking to strangers as well as acquaintances about daily life, problems, weather, etc).

b. Health and Medicine (asking about health, the ability to tell one's health problems/symptoms to a doctor, discussing a disease and how it is contracted and the possible forms of treatment, and the side-effects that these may cause)

c. Politics (vocabulary related to politics; elections; passing laws; issues like social security; healthcare system; taxation; etc).

d. Social issues in South Asia such as remarriage; plight of the elderly; untouchability, etc.

Bibliography:

Handouts made by the instructor, short films (YouTube), video and audio clips from Bollywood movies or TV shows such as “Satyamev Jayate” (http://www.satyamevjayate.in/), as well as Meena UNICEF (Hindi and Urdu)

Evaluation will be based on class participation, weekly vocabulary tests, 2 Midterms, and a final video project that will portray an interview or a conversation, and a monologue.

HINDI-URDU 310 Hindi-Urdu IV: Topics in Advanced Hindi-Urdu

(Meets 2 days a week)

Topics in Advanced Hindi-Urdu – These topics are independent of each other, and can be taken in any sequence.

Registration Requirements
C- or better in three quarters of Hindi-Urdu 211 or equivalent, or by placement test or with instructor consent.

Some of the topics that will be offered on a rotating basis for the fourth year level Hindi-Urdu are as follows:

  • Hind_Urd 310-0 Fantastical Stories
  • Hind_Urd 310-0 Partition stories
  • Hind_Urd 310-0 Modern Hindi-Urdu Short Stories
  • Hind_Urd 310-0 Hindi-Urdu Poetry
  • Hind_Urd 310-0 Hindi-Urdu Graphic Novel and Film

In their fourth year of Hindi-Urdu language study the students are focusing on fine aspects of their speech. They are using rich idiomatic expressions to discuss a range of topics. By the end of the fourth year, the students are able to talk in depth about abstract and concrete things. For example, they should be able to relay in great detail what they saw or heard, and they should be able to exhaustively discuss a wide range of topics related to social, political and historical issues/events.